God and Science: Friends or Foes?

Pick up your Bible and trace the historical story-line of the Israelites, from Abraham down to the New Testament Jesus and His followers. If you read the story like any other story, you will notice a significant trend. Take Moses and the burning bush, for example. Apparently, this event was unusual to Moses. It was not natural. Bushes just don’t spontaneously ignite; and when they burn, they get consumed; they just don’t burn on and on and on.

science godOr take the case of the Israelites at the shores of the Red Sea. Moses, at the command of God, raises his staff and voila! The body of water divides into two great walls with a dry path between them. Waters don’t just part with nothing but air to hold them in place. That was not natural.

These events and many others, as described in the Old Testament, were considered strange, miraculous and “unscientific” by those who witnessed them. They were considered unnatural, even supernatural, if you’d like to call them that.

What these events, and the reactions evoked, tell us is that there was a norm the people were used to, what they could see with their eyes and perceive with their senses. These Old Testament “primitives” knew a miracle when they saw one. Why? Because their senses and minds were scientific. They could discern a specific pattern or law in nature, and they knew when this law was defied.

These people were not blindly superstitious as they have often been presented. Continue reading God and Science: Friends or Foes?

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Blog Break (1 Mar 13)

Here are some interesting reads to end your week and start your March:

  1. THE MYTH OF GOVERNMENT NEUTRALITY : “Most Americans, recognizing that a government-sponsored philosophy would conflict with many citizens’ cherished beliefs (and possibly violate the establishment clause), would say that the government should be neutral. But at the same time, they would want the government to defend and promote certain ideas—about human equality, for example—even if that promotion conflicted with the beliefs of some Americans. We want the government to be neutral, except when we don’t want it to be.”
  2. In HOW TO BE MENTORED WITHOUT A MENTOR, Jodi Ware empathizes with those who do not have the privilege or opportunity of having a one-on-one mentoring relationship with an older man or woman. “I had in mind, of course, the idea that mentoring involves a formal, weekly or biweekly meeting with a wise older woman—doing a Bible or book study together and learning how to live as a Christian woman. I have never experienced this specific kind of mentoring.”
  3. Finally, AFRICA NEEDS GOD. This is the last thing you would hear coming out of the mouth of a self-confessed atheist. Matthew Parris: “The Christians were always different. Far from having cowed or confined its converts, their faith appeared to have liberated and relaxed them. There was a liveliness, a curiosity, an engagement with the world – a directness in their dealings with others – that seemed to be missing in traditional African life. They stood tall.”

Have a blessed reading time, friends.

 

Blog Break (25 Feb 13)

Three reads to enrich your week. The first one is lengthy but timely. The second is brief and to the point. And the third one is, well, just read and find out:

  1. THE IDOL OF ‘OPEN’ OPTIONS: “We worship the god of open options. And he is killing us. He kills our relationships, because he tells us it’s better not to become too involved. He kills our service to others because he tells us it might be better to keep our weekends to ourselves. He kills our giving because he tells us these are uncertain financial times and you never know when you might need that money.”
  2. In I CHOOSE PEACE, Serah Njambi reminds Kenyans (with the General Elections a week away) that peace is not just a prayer that we make or a dream that we have, it is also a practical choice that we make. “We are a generation that knows our country’s history just as well as we are aware of the LadyBird Series fairy-tales. We often forget the price that was paid for liberty and so we trash it at any opportunity without thinking of the implications.”
  3. Finally, in LEAVING (CHRIST)IANITY, Michael Patton takes us through the stages that many people go through on their way to apostasy, losing their faith or simply leaving Christianity. “Ignorance. Pity. Shame. These are all word descriptions she associated with Christianity. However, through these superficial word descriptions, it was evident that the best root word to describe her feelings was “betrayal”.  She had been betrayed by the Church, because they duped her into a belief not unlike that of the tooth fairy or Santa Claus.”

Overall, may God inspire, comfort and admonish you through the reading of HIS WORD this week, friends.

The Irony of the Atheist Church

There’s an atheist “church” in London. It’s called The Sunday Assembly. Started by British comedians Sanderson Jones and Pippa Evans, the Sunday Assembly meets every month in north London at the site of a former Christian church. The church is basically modeled on a typical Christian church. The main difference between this and other churches, as the founders say, is that it does not have all the religious dogma. Instead, the aim of the church is to encourage the members and help the community:

“No matter what the subject, the goal of The Sunday Assembly is to solace worries, provoke kindness and inject a bit more whizziness into the everyday,” the group says.

church
1. THE IRONY OF ‘NO RELIGIOUS DOGMA’
The first irony of the atheist church is the fact that it exists at all. Since the “church” concept, which gave rise to the “church” set up is a product of religious dogma, it is rather hypocritical to have the “effects” of dogma without dogma itself. Maintaining a “dogma-less” approach to any congregational unity will guarantee nothing but the inevitable collapse of that congregation. Continue reading The Irony of the Atheist Church

Blog Break (8 Feb 13)

Here are links to three interesting reads that I think are worth your weekend reading time:

  1. SHOULD WE CHEER FOR GOD? “When you’re watching a football game and your team scores, what do you do? You Cheer! You burst out of your seat and pump your fist and yell and clap and slap five with those around you!. So why aren’t you like that toward God? You should express that same kind of excitement and joy toward Him!”
  2. In A LETTER TO (SOME) ATHEISTS, Michael Patton responds to the way many atheists like to oversimplify belief in God, comparing and likening (or equating) it to belief in Santa Claus. “If belief in God was on par with belief in Santa, then why would there be people who hold positions in seminaries and universities all over the world who not only believe in God, but spend their lives making (what they believe to be) rational defenses for such a belief?”
  3. Do Muslims and Christians worship the same God, but by different names? Is God by any other name still God? In A ROSE IS A ROSE, R.C. Sproul attempts to show how and why all religions do not worship the same God. “It is a quantum leap to go from saying that God by any other name is still God, to saying that all the great religions in the world believe in the same Being though they call Him different names.”

Enjoy your reading, friends 🙂