Loving the Enemies We Make

It is an assumption we always make when we read bible passages about loving our enemies, turning the other cheek and blessing those who persecute us. We assume that we are always the victims. When we read such passages, we tend to see ourselves as the innocent target to the slap or the accusation or the insult.

cheekBut the truth is that more often than not, we deserve it. At least I know I do. For instance, not so long ago I lied to a friend, and through that lie, made her an enemy. She “found me out” and I paid the price by not only losing her trust, but also her friendship.

Now, of course I asked for her forgiveness and repented of my sin before God. Ideally, that would be the end of that. But reconciliation is much more complicated, and much less Utopian.

Chesterton once said that “we choose our friends and we make our enemies”. While it is easy to see how this happens, there is something we deliberately make ourselves blind to — the fact that having an enemy does not always mean we are the innocent party. This victim mentality is a product of our sinful, self-preserving tendencies.

We don’t like to look at ourselves as the guilty ones. Continue reading

The Friend We Have in Jesus

“Do nothing out of selfish ambition or vain conceit. Rather, in humility value others above yourselves, not looking to your own interests but each of you to the interests of the others.” [Philippians 2:3-4]

I’ve been thinking about Jesus as the embodiment, the example and the power behind true friendship. I’ve been thinking about the kind of friend that Jesus was to those around Him. The kind of friend that Jesus continues to be towards us today. The kind of friend that Jesus calls and urges us to be. I believe that a great part of being Christ-like is to be the friend that Christ was towards those around Him. The following are just a few aspects of friendship that I’ve gleaned from my personal study on Jesus as a friend. Jesus was: Continue reading